Category Archives: THINGS

DO CATS SMILE? ANNIE REBEKAH GARDNER INVESTIGATES

I would dump the husb who left my babe out alone. Just sayin’.

 

Persians are very serious.

 

Bob. BOB! Prove it, Bob. Say it.

 

😦

God, I cannot BELIEVE the idiots they allow on messageboards these days. YES DUMMY YOU CAN TELL. DOYOYOYOYOY. Yes, Vik Rubenfeld, you can tell. You can.

 

Thanks for sparing us the details, Will.

 

Mister_c, I concur!! And I forgive your terrible grammar.

IT’S JUST A LITTLE BLOOD

It appears as though some Massachusetts liberals (or faux-berals, as I like to say. Or neo-liberals, even!) have gotten their panties in a bunch over some things that my congressman Mike Capuano said. Let’s review, shall we?

Mike, potential future challenger to centerfold Senator Scott Brown, was at a union rally in solidarity with the workers of Wisconsin with a few other congresspersons when he made the following statement:

“I’m proud to be here with people who understand that it’s more than just sending an email to get you going. Every once and awhile you need to get out on the streets and get a little bloody when necessary.”

Cue the we’re-scared-of-violence backlash.

I honestly believe that Congressman Capuano was not advocating a bloody, violent takeover of the state, and was instead engaging in some Real Talk, which is the fact that facilitating social change is a chaotic, messy process (you can’t make an omelette without breaking a few eggs, the revolution isn’t a dinner party, insert other aphorisms here, etc.). I think this is a real problem amongst progressive communities (not just in Massachusetts, though lord knows it rings true, but throughout the US), this presumptuous notion that social change can be a la-di-da process. It can’t be. It doesn’t matter how peaceful your tactics are. The state will use brute force (even in a democratic state!).

Stop being so scared of blood, guys.

P.S. I think it goes without saying that if discourses like this continue, it might get bloody whether we like it or not, the tragic events involving Representative Giffords being proof positive of that.

SOME THOUGHTS RE: HUMANS & VIOLENCE & UPRISING

This is a really graphic video, but I’m posting it because I think there’s a kind of discourse emerging about violence and the way we consume it. Obviously I won’t use this venue go into great detail about violence and Hollywood and what-have-you, but I think that the way we distinguish Hollywood violence with real-life violence is notable, and wasn’t something I thought about actively until the video of Neda from Tehran’s 2009 protests surfaced. It is, in essence, a snuff film (which they all are, I guess). Following, there have been moments since- Khaled Said’s murder, for one, photos of children in hospitals in Bahrain, things that I’m reluctant to surf the net for because of their disturbing content- that ask for a consideration of violence and what it actually means in a popular uprising, in toppling a dictator.

And while this isn’t addressed outright in these graphic firsthand accounts, I think that the discourses of martyrdom that have become so prevalent in the past month or so are really under-addressed when it comes to How Revolution Works. I think, given a predilection for Islamophobia these days, the West (I don’t like that term but I will use it, anyway) tiptoes around this idea of martyrdom because of its (misguided) associations of martyrdom with fundamentalism (and I heard we are a Christian Nation, Deist forefathers be damned and, consarnit, we all know the Only Martyrs Ever were Christian ones! Soooooooooo.), but I think it’s a concept that’s really important in grasping Revolution and How It Happens. While I personally did not lose anyone during the uprising, the mass funerals and wall of martyrs in Tahrir, as well as virtual memorials, i.e. this, come up constantly as actual, human examples of what dictatorship (and U.S complicity. Don’t forget that!) hath wrought, and why it can’t sustain itself.

I am going to write more about this after I finish reading this.

EGYPT’S INTIFADA: A LEXICON

Now that my eyeballs have all but dried up and fallen out as a result of staring at TV and computer screens for approximately 20 hours a day, in the vein of Sarthanapalos’ excellent piece, A Guide: How Not To Say Stupid Stuff About Egypt, I’d like to provide a handy companion to the language and discourses surrounding the uprising. Not afraid to be servicey!

REVOLUTION & UPRISING

Calling this a revolution is all well-meaning and good, but I need to emphasize that this will not be a revolution unless radical change is implemented, and facts on the ground suggest that the Mubarak security apparatus is allergic to radical change for the time being. The United States’ commitment to “stability” and “orderly transition” further establishes that a likelihood of radical change is small, at this point. (Have I mentioned how much I hate my administration right now? Radical change in Egypt, and radical change everywhere.)

“PROTESTERS CLASH” & “PEACEFUL PROTESTERS”

I’m aware that the horrific events that occurred yesterday (and that are still occurring, as I write this) have largely been broadcast as clashes, but it seems a little bit (a lot bit!) unseemly to conflate peaceful (peaceful. Do you know what that means? PEACEFUL. Rinse. Repeat.) demonstrators’ attempts at self-defense (never forget that these thugs are out for blood. Seven died in Cairo alone in the past 24 hours) with “clashes”. If someone was coming at you with tear gas, on a camel brandishing a sword, or with chains, or  knives, perhaps you would pick up a rock too?

TURMOIL & CHAOS

Al Jazeera English, lord love ’em, has finally ceased its headlines of “turmoil” and “chaos.” Again, make no mistake: Even in the absence of police on the streets, Cairo did not see anything resembling chaos or turmoil until their return. Neighborhoods self-organized and localized defense teams against thug looters. Communities cooperated and fed each other, sheltered each other. It was not chaotic until Wednesday 2nd February, when paid thugs went out in full force.

PRO-MUBARAK PROTESTERS & THUGS

All of the “pro-government counter-protesters” detained and handled by anti-government demonstrators yesterday held state security ID’s. These are men who have been paid by the government to enact the government’s wishes to silence the opposition. Calling them protesters illegitimates the word itself. These were orchestrated demonstrations not-so-coincidentally timed with the return of the Internet to divide opposition movements. Unfortunately, it might be working.

Do your best to not let this 82-year-old curmudgeon and his goons win. Do what you can to hold the regime accountable, do what you can to hold the international community accountable.

TOOLED LEATHER: SO HOT RIGHT NOW

Now you know! I say this because I recently purchased such a purse in Tunis (maybe I’ll post pictures, someday!) and I think we all know how well-dressed I am.

Also I am only posting this because it’s the Biannual Annie Questions Her Life Trajectory Week. In layman’s terms, that would be finals season, folks.